➚ [KINDLE] ❄ The Man from St. Petersburg By Ken Follett ➤ – Transportjobsite.co.uk

The Man from St. Petersburg txt The Man from St. Petersburg, text ebook The Man from St. Petersburg, adobe reader The Man from St. Petersburg, chapter 2 The Man from St. Petersburg, The Man from St. Petersburg 37c489 His Name Was Feliks He Came To London To Commit A Murder That Would Change History A Master Manipulator, He Had Many Weapons At His Command, But Against Him Were Ranged The Whole Of The English Police, A Brilliant And Powerful Lord, And The Young Winston Churchill Himself These Odds Would Have Stopped Any Man In The World Except The Man From St Petersburg


About the Author: Ken Follett

Ken Follett is one of the world s most successful authors Over 165 million copies of the 31 books he has written have been sold in over 80 countries and in 33 languages Born on June 5th, 1949 in Cardiff, Wales, the son of a tax inspector, Ken was educated at state schools and went on to graduate from University College, London, with an Honours degree in Philosophy later to be made a Fellow of



10 thoughts on “The Man from St. Petersburg

  1. says:

    My first Ken Follett Although no pirates are involved, the word swashbuckling comes to mind The story is set in London in the early 1900 s It s fiction, but enough real life characters and events are involved that is has an aura of a historical novel.A Russian anarchist is trying to assassinate a Russian Price, the son of Czar Nicholas The Prince is in London trying to negotiate an alliance between England and Russia against Germany in what is assumed to be an upcoming war A very young Winston Churchill is involved in the negotiations The Prince is staying at the London home of his cousin who married a British Lord Amazingly, the anarchist used to be her lover back in Russia 17 years ago And he learns she has a daughter who is 17 Could it be The anarchist re ignites the old flames to earn entrance into the home to try to assassinate the prince.Woven into the story are true historical events The daughter hears Emmeline Pankhurst speak and joins the suffragette movement We are given readings from Russian revolutionary pamphlets Archduke Ferdinand is assassinated near the end of the story.So we have a fast moving kind of made for TV thriller The coincidences are astounding We have several just in the nick of time escapes and a brave main character managing to catch and disarm a nitroglycerine bomb.The characters are well developed, especially the anarchist, his Russian former lover, and the daughter But there is little depth to the writing It s like a historical romance than a historical novel So I ll call it a fun story and good entertainment.Photo of Emmaline Pankhurst from theguardian.comPhoto of the author from ken follett.com


  2. says:

    How can I root for an assassin Ken Follett has always been a personal favorite of mine I love the way he mixes fiction with reality in all of his books, whether he s chosen to write about the Cold War or the lead up to World War 1 or 2 The writing style is never something I complain about with Follett and here is no exception The sentences bring me to a whole other plane of historical existence, where history has altered to bring me there as an observer Perfection Ken Follett spares not an ounce of genius in bringing his characters to life and weaving them together in electrifying narrative His artistry is one that burdens the reader with sorting the protagonists from the antagonists, enriching each character s complexion and back story with such talent that you may just end up pulling for the whole lot as the novel winds to a close.Situated in the lead up to the First World War in 1914 London, we find Britain pushing to secure an alliance with the Russian Empire War seems all but inevitable, and intel indicates a low chance of Allied success unless the whole of the Triple Entente is prepared to throw their martial weight against Germany.This thriller has a lot to offer, from the international intrigue of anarchist subversion ism hurled against the British secret police, an endearing and dynamic cast, chase scenes, to the masterful pacing and pitch perfect dialogue, all encased in a historical backdrop that will lend the reader in a sense of familiarity with prewar London Sure, a few of the plot turns are a bit too sharp and escape sequences faintly implausible, but the gripping prose and fluorescent cast are than adequate to keep you anchored firmly to your seat.It may not be as polished around the edges as Eye of the Needle, or as seductive as his massively medieval opus, Pillars of the Earth, but Follett s The Man From St Petersburg is surely just as absorbing, insisting you delay that next meal just a little while longer so you can see how the current scene plays out.


  3. says:

    I read this many years ago, and have now re read it It is a great thriller with an unusual twist it may be that you consider the assassin the man from St Petersburg to be the good guy with higher morals than those the Brits opposing him The action sequences are superb, and the teaching narratives short enough and clear enough not to intrude.


  4. says:

    Ken Follett spares not an ounce of genius in bringing his characters to life and weaving them together in electrifying narrative His artistry is one that burdens the reader with sorting the protagonists from the antagonists, enriching each character s complexion and back story with such brio that you may just end up pulling for the whole lot to triumph as the novel winds to a close The Man From St Petersburg is of course no exception, with Follett s tried and true, World War era themed cat and mouse thriller once again taking center stage Ever the epicure of historical fiction, Follett treats his settings with care, honoring the historical minutia and injecting them with multiple shots of hair raising drama The global tensions and dis ease surrounding the two largest global engagements to date provide blueprints aplenty for building an engrossing alternate timeline Situated in the lead up to the First World War in 1914 London, we find Britain pushing to secure an alliance with the Russian Empire War seems all but inevitable, and intel indicates a low chance of Allied success unless the whole of the Triple Entente is prepared to throw their martial weight against Germany.The man chosen to represent Russia in the negotiations is the courtly admiral Prince Orlov, nephew to British aristocrat Lord Walden Importuned by no less a figure than Winston Churchill, Walden is tasked with brokering the secret bond and saving his nation from impending defeat A delicate assignment, no doubt, but one made all the perilous by a shrewdly intelligent and combat adept anarchist, whose life is interwoven with the Walden household s in variously surprising ways.Enter Feliks Kschessinsky, who might just be the most unforgettable covert agent this side of Jason Bourne The Russian idealist is fed up with his mother country s penchant for embroiling its citizens in wars in which they have no choice in participating and vows to sever the alliance talks with Great Britain by assassinating the admiral Fearless yet stringently cautious, unflinchingly determined, almost too capable of evading his pesky pursuers, and ornamented with the occasional flash of charisma and sensuality, Feliks is the cloak and dagger character you just can t help but cheer for If you re a pacifist at heart, you may have all the reason to get behind him His frequent bouts with Walden and the full armada of the British police force ratchet up the intensity as the walls close in around the Muscovite assassin But Feliks finds help in the most unsuspecting of placesBeyond the instant allure of Feliks and his skirmishes with Walden and company, Follett has also arranged equally enticing female leads who are not subordinately tossed in but who command central roles in the narrative Walden s wife, Lydia, whose Russian past is dredged up in plot twisting fashion, and their daughter, Charlotte, with her closeted upbringing and later affinity with the suffragette movement underway in Britain at the time, round out the exquisite cast There isn t too much that can be shared about these two characters without giving major plot shifts away, but their presence is integral to the whole and compete with Feliks on every page for rights to the most memorable character.Closing ThoughtsFollett s 1982 thriller has a lot to offer, from the international intrigue of anarchist subversionism hurled against the British secret police, an endearing and dynamic cast, Ludlum esque chase scenes, sensual but not at all gratuitous sex, to the masterful pacing and pitch perfect dialogue, all encased in a historical backdrop that will lend the reader an osmotic familiarity with prewar London Sure, a few of the plot turns are a bit too sharp and escape sequences faintly implausible, but the gripping prose and fluorescent cast are than adequate to keep you anchored firmly to your seat It may not be as polished around the edges as Eye of the Needle, or as seductive as his massively medieval opus, Pillars of the Earth, but Follett s The Man From St Petersburg is surely just as absorbing, insisting you delay that next meal just a little while longer so you can see how the current scene plays out This is smooth escapism, enclothed in classic Follett garb.The only question that remains which character will you root for Note This review is republished from my official website.


  5. says:

    Another winner by Ken Follett It takes a great writer to put history, suspense, psychological, and some romance into one book, and Follett is one of those great writers The Man From St Petersburg takes place in London, England in the early 1900 s right before the start of the First World War A mysterious man named Feliks travels to London to kill a man and change history But when plotting the demise he comes face to face with a woman he had an affair with years ago, who is now the wife of a powerful English lord who is meeting with Feliks s target.The story also had many Historical facts, one being when women were not allowed to vote Towards the end I was up past my bedtime waiting to see what would happen next The character of Feliks was very interesting, I was expecting him to be a cold hearted killer but after getting to know him, I considered him a cross between James Bond and Darth Vader There were times when he d show his good side, and times when he s show his evil side Exciting thriller Awesome book


  6. says:

    Follett strikes again with another winner and he seems to favor this time period around World War 1 where this book time period is as was his masterpiece of Fall of Giants Another 5 star rating for thrill, suspense, intriguing dialogue and historical characters a young Winston Churchill


  7. says:

    Enjoyed this period thriller by Ken Follett It fit right in with reading I ve been doing on both Russia and WWI Some of the plot details are a little fantastic, but because it s FOllett and he keeps things moving, the reader doesn t really have much time to sit and think about that You just want to turn the page, read the next chapter, find out what happens next What a talent He Sketches out some pretty good characters, not the least of whom is the anarchist Feliks, on a mission to assassinate a Russian diplomat before he can arrange the alliance that will bring Russia into the oncoming World War It s 1914 and the world is about to change for all of Europe, as well as the millions of Russians heading for revolution IN retrospect, modern day readers may agree that Felix s cause is the right one Yet most probably see him as a cold blooded killer who needs to be stopped That task falls to Earl Stephen Walden, the aristocrat who finds his family in the middle of the conflict his Russian wife as well as his naive but rapidly maturing debutante daughter Follett throws a few surprises at us, keeps us guessing, in realistic feeling depiction of prewar London Glad I picked this one up


  8. says:

    Ken Follett sure has written a hell of a lot of good books at this point in time He is remarkable for the consistency of his style and the well groundedness of everything he does As well as several other fine points of skill Follett is perhaps the foremost author able to combine historical fiction with espionage fiction Before his career shifted whole heartedly into hist fic he was responsible for big hits like, The Eye of the Needle. That romp is among the best WWII yarns ever penned Around the same time as he was building his career he also conceived this interesting and fun little tale I m reviewing now I really feel it s one which you shouldn t miss if you can help it You won t come away wanting Follett is too solid in his craftsmanship It takes a lot of restraint to write action intrigue in a controlled manner which builds suspense in proper, measured, stages Follett does that At the same time, his prose is supple and breezy one never gets bogged down reading him This particular tale is enticing too because he pulls off the feat of setting it during the wild and woolly anarchist era The story concept is frankly wonderful and he manages it off admirably Over time, I have come to regard this as one of Follett s most charming outings I m not ignoring the fact that some readers rise up with minor quibbles but overall this is a very fun, lively diversion Of course it s lightweight but yields up gobs of atmosphere, memorable bits of period detail , and impassioned characters Cigars, brandy, English country houses, railways and seaports, nitrogylcerine, affairs, top hats and greatcoats, and men leaping from carriages Hurrah


  9. says:

    As I watched various vignettes of the Women s March on Washington yesterday, and saw some really objectionable historical posters making fun of the suffragette movement, I was reminded of this novel When I read it back in the early eighties, I did not like it as much as his earlier thrillers because the suspense factor was muted But looking back, I think this may be one of his better novels with excellent characterisation and human drama Charlotte, the elder daughter of Lord and Lady Walden and pioneering suffragette, is excellently drawn as is the description of the suffragette march, men jeering from the sidelines as the police systematically assault the activists I feel now that this novel questions the whole philosophy of capitalism and imperialism, and shows anarchists in a very sympathetic light.


  10. says:

    Clumsy.Clumsy in its account of class, suffrage, politics, relationships.Clumsy in its telling Every paragraph should have begun Coincidently or Conveniently Not for me.


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