❥ [KINDLE] ❂ Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry) By Yehuda Amichai ➢ – Transportjobsite.co.uk

Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry) pdf Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry), ebook Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry), epub Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry), doc Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry), e-pub Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry), Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry) 467ca0146be Bilingual Edition, With Translations By Assia Gutmann, Harold Schimmel, Chana Bloch, YA Ted Hughes, David Rosenberg, Et Al A New Printing Of This Large Collection By The Poet Commonly Regarded As Israel S Most Prominent And One Of The Major Contemporary World Poets Born In Germany In , Amichai Left With His Family For Israel In


10 thoughts on “Poems of Jerusalem and Love Poems (Sheep Meadow Poetry)

  1. says:

    We were together in my time, in your place,You gave the place and I the time.Quietly your body waited for the seasons to change.Fashions passed over it to shorten, to lengthen,with flowers or in white silk, clinging.We swapped human values for those of beasts,calm and tiger like and for ever.And for all that, ready to burn at any momentwith the dry grass of the end of summer.I divided the days with you, nights.We exchanged a look with rain,We were not like dreamers,even in our dreams.And in the unquiet, nestled the quiet,in my time, in your place.The many dreams I now dream of youprophesy your end with me As the multiplying crowds of sea gullscome where the sea ends.


  2. says:

    In the Middle of This CenturyIn the middle of this century we turned to each otherwith half faces and full eyeslike an ancient Egyptian pictureand for a short while.I stroked your hairin the opposite direction to your journey,we called to each other,like calling out the names of townswhere nobody stopsalong the route.Lovely is the world rising early to evil,lovely is the world falling asleep to sin and pity,in the mingling of ourselves, you and I,lovely is the world.The earth drinks men and their loveslike wine,to forget It can t.And like the contours of the Judean hills,we shall never find peace.In the middle of this century we turned to each other,I saw your body, throwing shade, waiting for me,the leather straps for a long journeyalready tightening across my chest.I spoke in praise of your mortal hips,you spoke in praise of my passing face,I stroked your hair in the direction of your journey,I touched your flesh, prophet of your end,I touched your hand which has never slept,I touched your mouth which may yet sing.Dust from the desert covered the tableat which we did not eatbut with my finger I wrote on itthe letters of your name A Pity, We Were Such a Good InventionThey amputatedYour thighs off my hips.As far as I m concernedThey are all surgeons All of them.They dismantle usEach from the other.As far as I m concernedThey are all engineers All of them.A pity We were such a goodAnd loving invention.An aeroplane made from a man and wife.Wings and everything.We hovered a little above the earth.We even flew a little I was instantly haunted by these Chagall paintings while reading this poem I know, associating Amichai and Chagall is not original , it s like they illustrate the metaphors..https goo.gl images sUyCZRhttps goo.gl images saR7oBhttps goo.gl images wEihFghttps goo.gl images aV4WGJPolitics and history has also largely influenced his poetry The poem Jerusalem is my favourite in this collection JerusalemOn a roof in the Old Citylaundry hanging in the late afternoon sunlight the white sheet of a woman who is my enemy,the towel of a man who is my enemy,to wipe off the sweat of his brow.In the sky of the Old Citya kite.At the other end of the string,a childI can t seebecause of the wall.We have put up many flags,they have put up many flags.To make us think that they re happy.To make them think that we re happy The religion is embedded in Amichai s poetry Two QuatrainsIOnce i escaped, but i do not remember why or from which God,I shall therefore travel through my life like Jonah in his dark fish,We ve settled it between us, I and the fish, we re both in the world s bowels,I shall not come out, he will not digest me God s FateGod s fate Is nowThe fate of trees rocks sun and moon,The ones they stopped worshippingWhen they began to believe in God.But he s forced to remain with usAs are the trees, as are the rocksSun moon and stars According to Chana Kronfeld, his long time friend and translator, the intertextuality with the Jewish texts underlie Amichai s poetics However, one of the major observations that she makes is that his poems are largely misinterpreted and misunderstood by his readers In fact, his intertextual practices consist of iconoclastic allusions to sacred texts, Biblical narratives and rabbinical exegesis In this matter, the great popularity of his poetry in the United States has been accompanied by some readerly obtuseness to what this poetry actually says and does Amichai s poems are embraced by American readers who, knowing very little about the sacred texts he takes apart, remain unaware of and uninterested in his resistant, anticlerical poetics and are lulled into complacency by the apparent simplicity of his poems surface The mere reference to prayers, God, and the Bible in his poetry has qualified him for the role of a religious Jewish poet laureate for the Jewish American community Thus, Amichai s poetry is not infrequently used to provide readers in the United States with something textual to hold onto, either as a marker of some fuzzy, feel good Jewish identity or, generally, for its pleasantly vague sense of Old World tradition Moreover, Amichai s poetry contains surprising sacrilegious images, according to Yoseph Milman In his review published by the Cambridge University Press, Milman examines two poems titled The Bar Mitzvah Celebration and The Voyeur and he asserts that the poet associates expressions, motifs, and concepts taken from the area of religion and holy texts with sexual motifs appropriate to erotic or pornographic literature I was intrigued by a sense of fragmentation that pervades his poems Several poems reveal a persona scattered throughout space and time..My Parent s MigrationAnd my parents migration has not yet calmed in me.My blood goes on shaking at its walls,As the bowl after it is set down.And my parents migration has not yet calmed in me,Winds continually over stones.Earth forgets the footsteps of those who walk,An awful fate, stumps of talk after midnight,An achievement, a retreat Night remindsAnd day forgets.My eyes which have looked a long time into a vast desert,Are a little calmed One woman The ruled of a gameNobody had ever completely explained The laws of pain and weight.Even now my heartMakes only a bare livingWith its daily love.My parents in their migration.On the crossroads where I am forever orphaned,Too young to die, too old to play.The weariness of the minerThe emptiness of the quarryIn one body.Archaeology of the futureMuseums of what is still to happen.And my parents migration has not yet calmed in me,And from bitter peoples I learned bitter languagesFor my silence among the houses Which are alwaysLike ships.Already my veins, my tendonsAre a tangle of ropes i will never undoFinally, my ownDeathAnd an end to my parents migration While reading his poems I got the impression that his multiple cultural identities and departures have instilled bitterness and melancholy in his psyche and left him victim of endless existential dilemmas. He crafts images that oscillate between presence and absence, imagination and reality, modern and traditional, memory and oblivion, past and present, the self and the other, all which try to cohere throughout the span of the poem Tim Ellison describes brilliantly how Amichai s poetic attempts to deal with the divergent elements of life Ruins are crucial to Amichai s poetry ancient ruins, the ruins of homes destroyed by war, ruined relationships but only because they provide witness to the persistence of things Our very bodies, he insinuates, are the ruins of our ancestry, and in dreams we are the meeting ground of the living and the dead The self is a marriage of past and present not just the self as such but the dreaming self in particular, the painted self, the adventuring self that goes out to ruins to sit and think in quiet about what has passed from the earth It is once again imagination that awakens and enlivens things, rescuing people and places from the knife of time and giving them a space between life and death to dwell in.The Holocaust, of course, was a cruel twist of fate and this historical tragical event has had a major effect on his life. he lost members of his family, friends and his childhood love, Ruth, who couldn t obtain an immigration visa to the States and perished later in a death camp. she remains a haunting presence throughout his poignant poems.N.B I didn t realize until later while I was reading some reviews that the translator Assia Gutmann is actually Assia Wevill, Ted Hughe s mistress, who committed suicide the tragic incident caused also the death of their daughter like also did his wife, the poet Sylvia Plath who suffered from a severe depression because of their relationship..


  3. says:

    I usually stick to fiction and non fiction, and the occasional screenplay or scriptbut boy, am I glad I read Amichai s poemsso much so, I bought another collection of his just this week There are too many lovely moments here to list them all, but I found this book inspirational and beautiful.


  4. says:

    Some of the most lyrical and sensual poetry I ve ever read In My Time, In Your Place and A Pity We Were Such a Good Invention are two of my personal favorites.


  5. says:

    reminiscent of 12th century persian poetry in it style, but very pointed and contemporary in its subject matter


  6. says:

    Read and reread, often It s an excellent translation Amichai s poetry captures the essence of being in Jerusalem and makes me feel I m there.


  7. says:

    Thank you, Emily


  8. says:

    Jerusalem..rose of cities, sacred to three religions..the city of peace that has never known peace..this is my first reading of an Israeli poet, all my previous readings about Jerusalem were by Arab poets, some live in the city and others long for it..I myself wrote about Jerusalem..for my love for it is beyond words..JerusalemOn a roof in the Old Citylaundry hanging in the late afternoon sunlight the white sheet of a woman who is my enemy,the towel of a man who is my enemy,to wipe off the sweat of his brow.In the sky of the Old Citya kite.At the other end of the string,a childI can t seebecause of the wall.We have put up many flags,they have put up many flags.To make us think that they re happy.To make them think that we re happy.


  9. says:

    Really quite a fan of this guy I got the bilingual edition so that I could practice reading the Hebrew out loud to get a better feel for his work, and highly suggest it Of course, now I m spoiled for everyday modern Hebrew, and translators are traitors, but the point is the work is good enough in English to make you cry, and in Hebrew, it s even sublime Love Pain Longing War and Peace Yehuda Amichai s your man.


  10. says:

    already made me cry


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